Comfort Zones Don’t Fill My Heart

My heart is full.

It’s a good thing, since it’s February; the month that celebrates the heart.

I have a good friend and client who ponders the question of why we have all deemed the heart the center of our emotions. After all, he says, it’s simply a beating organ.

At some point in our history, right or wrong, the heart has taken on the burden of being home to our most personal emotions. A text message of “I love you” is often accompanied by a heart. The confession of “I don’t have hate in my heart” is followed by admiration. And uttering “My heart is yours” is about the sweetest thing we can ever say. Even a faster heartbeat is associated with falling in love.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Digital

A funny thing happened on the way to distributing one of DDCC's prized digital newsletters. The employees asked for it in print too.

DDCC’s original assignment was clear: Interview, write, design and produce a compelling and visual digital employee newsletter for 300 recipients inside this West Coast-based high-tech engineering firm. The company’s inside team had been putting together the newsletter themselves for the past two years using bits and pieces submitted from employees.

DDCC’s charge was to “kick it up a notch,” bring a journalistic, non-biased approach, add customer, department and employee profiles and brand and update the design. DDCC was asked to interact with the internal staff for their input, yet allow them to finally do their day jobs versus spending so much time on the newsletter—all requested within a strict corporate budget.

CAN HE CHANGE…PLEASE?

Every once in a while, I receive an assignment from a Fortune 500 company to provide Communications Coaching to an executive who’s gone rogue.

Here’s the usual profile:

“We have an officer who is extremely bright and is responsible for a very large P & L in our organization. This person is very good at what he does and his work is very good….but he gets lots of complaints from his team and from other departments in the company that he is brash and condescending. He can really come off as arrogant. Can you help?”