A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Digital

A funny thing happened on the way to distributing one of DDCC's prized digital newsletters. The employees asked for it in print too.

DDCC’s original assignment was clear: Interview, write, design and produce a compelling and visual digital employee newsletter for 300 recipients inside this West Coast-based high-tech engineering firm. The company’s inside team had been putting together the newsletter themselves for the past two years using bits and pieces submitted from employees.

DDCC’s charge was to “kick it up a notch,” bring a journalistic, non-biased approach, add customer, department and employee profiles and brand and update the design. DDCC was asked to interact with the internal staff for their input, yet allow them to finally do their day jobs versus spending so much time on the newsletter—all requested within a strict corporate budget.

CAN HE CHANGE…PLEASE?

Every once in a while, I receive an assignment from a Fortune 500 company to provide Communications Coaching to an executive who’s gone rogue.

Here’s the usual profile:

“We have an officer who is extremely bright and is responsible for a very large P & L in our organization. This person is very good at what he does and his work is very good….but he gets lots of complaints from his team and from other departments in the company that he is brash and condescending. He can really come off as arrogant. Can you help?”

Attitude of Gratitude

Gratitude works three ways.

Here at DDCC, we are forever grateful for our clients—but of course. Their choices are abundant, and when they choose our team to help, we feel a great sense of responsibility and accountability toward their trust and their goals.

When our clients express gratitude toward us, the taste is even sweeter.

Is He Comfortable or Not?…..You Make the Call

Comfortable.

It’s one of the best words ever.

When a C-level executive appears comfortable while giving an important presentation, the audience gives him or her other attributes too. Leaders are comfortable; so are visionaries. Comfortable implies confidence, connectivity, warmth and approachability. It also conveys knowledge.

That’s why I was so proud when my latest speech-coaching client—the president of a $200 million company—received this feedback after his recent shareholder meeting presentation:  “You were the most comfortable I have ever seen you!”; “You presented like you were so comfortable; like speaking to a small group in your backyard.”; “I cannot believe how comfortable you were up there, so much better than I’ve ever seen you!”